Pharma IQ Members

Tony
Hitchcock

Tony Hitchcock

Tony has over 26 years of experience in the large-scale manufacture of biopharmaceuticals. Tony has held positions in the Blood Products Laboratory (Elstree) and at Zeneca Pharmaceuticals in the protein process development department. Tony was a founding staff member of Cobra and has been responsible for the development of much of Cobra’s DNA manufacturing technology. Tony has published several papers in the field and is an inventor on two families of Cobra’s process patents. He also has extensive experience in chromatographic purification. Within Cobra, he has had a number of senior roles, managing both manufacturing and development functions within the company, and his current role is based on the development and introduction of new technologies into the company, with specific emphasis on single use systems.

He is currently a member of the steering committee of the UK Bioprocess Research Industry Club (BRIC), the scientific advisory of the Pharmaceutical Centre for Excellence (COEBP) at the University of Manchester and the industrial advisory board for the Astbury Centre at the University of Leeds. and an assessor for the UK Research Councils (EPSRC, BBSRC and MRC) Chemical Biology Collaborative Networks initiative.
21 results
of 3
Earlier this year I was fortunate enough to attend the Disposable Solutions meeting in Munich. A common theme of discussions was the on-going debates around the issues of leachable and extractables and the associated testing standards. This is a topic that has been debated for as long as I have been attending meetings on single use systems, and... Read more
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Earlier this year I was fortunate enough to attend the Disposable Solutions meeting in Munich. A common theme of discussions was the on-going debates around the issues of leachable and extractables and the associated testing standards. This is a topic that has been debated for as long as I have been attending meetings on single use systems, and... Read more
Tags:
Earlier this year I was fortunate enough to attend the Disposable Solutions meeting in Munich. A common theme of discussions was the on-going debates around the issues of leachable and extractables and the associated testing standards. This is a topic that has been debated for as long as I have been attending meetings on single use systems, and... Read more
Tags:
When we look at the current trends with what we can refer to as “next generation therapeutics”, whether it be ADCs or cell and gene therapy products, one trend is very clear, products are becoming increasingly complex in their nature. Certainly, the complexity of the manufacturing processes used to produce them clearly reflects this; hand in hand... Read more
At Cobra we have worked on the development of both naked plasmid DNA and viral gene therapy products for over 20 years. After some rather extended development times, it has been very rewarding to see a number progress out of Phase II clinical studies and customers wanting to take these products into Phase III studies.
Having worked in the development and production of early stage therapeutics for over 30 years I appreciate as much as anyone that this is often a highly challenging environment, not least with regards to overcoming technical and regulatory hurdles as well as seeking to meet a highly demanding timeline.
With this year’s Disposables Solutions meeting in Munich rapidly approaching I will focus this blog on some of the issues which I hope will be covered in presentations and discussions.
With single use systems becoming the norm, now is the time that industry must take stock of the situation and assess which are the challenges which may be hindering future progress. In this column Tony Hitchcock looks at these challenges and asks what can we in industry do to overcome them.
With the on-going maturation of single use systems, one of the growing discussions is on the topic of standardisation. With many companies and organisations being at cross purposes when it comes to these standards, it is up for debate whether standardisation will be possible. In this column, Tony Hitchcock dissects the issues surrounding this... Read more
The way in which single-use systems are being used is changing. In this column Tony Hitchcock looks at what is driving these changes. He also looks to the future, analysing what trends might mean for the future of biomanufacturing.
21 results
of 3